• Clifton Park Office


    map-cpClifton Park Office

    1770 Route 9 Suite 202
    Clifton Park, NY 12065

    Phone: (518) 631-2933
    Fax: (518) 371-7102

    Directions

  • Schodack Office


    map-schSchodack Office

    1547 Columbia Turnpike
    Castleton, NY 12033

    Phone: (518) 479-4156
    Fax: (518) 479-3794

    Directions

  • Chatham Office


    map-chathChatham Office

    113 Hudson Avenue
    Chatham, NY 12037

    Phone: (518) 392-6742
    Fax: (518) 392-6019

    Directions

  • Schenectady Office


    map-schenSchenectady Office

    461 Clinton Street Extension Suite 1
    Schenectady, NY 12305

    Phone: (518) 374-7222
    Fax: (518) 374-2051

    Directions

  • Cobleskill Office


    map-cobCobleskill Office

    132 MacArthur Ave
    Cobleskill, NY 12043

    Phone: (518) 982-2617

    Directions

  • Safety is our primary concern! All Upstate Dermatology staff are fully vaccinated against COVID.
    Feel safe knowing that anyone you see working at Upstate Dermatology, in all office locations, is vaccinated.

    Skin Types and At-Risk Groups

    Posted by Upstate Dermatology on Feb.18.16 in Skin Care

    Certain types of skin are at greater risk for developing sun damage and skin cancer. Do you know your skin type? Check out our photos and descriptions to find the one that best matches your skin.

    Your skin type is one of the main factors in your risk for skin cancer. There are six skin phototypes, going from light to dark. Individuals with skin types I and II face the highest risk of developing skin cancer, while types V and VI are at the lowest risk.  That is because those with more pigmentation have more natural protection from the sun.  However, people with darker skin can nonetheless get skin cancer. Like light-skinned people, they should be cautious of the sun and have regular examinations by a doctor.

    To get an idea of your degree of risk, rate yourself according to the following classification.

    Type I:

    skintype_1

    You always burn and never tan in the sun. You are extremely susceptible to skin damage as well as cancers like basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. You are also at very high risk for melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer. Generally follow The Skin Cancer Foundation’s prevention tips but use a sunscreen with a SPF of 30+ and clothing with a UPF rating of 30 or higher. Seek the shade whenever you are out in the sun. Check your skin head-to-toe each month, paying careful attention to any suspicious growths, and make sure you have an annual professional skin checkup.

    Type II:

    skintype_2

    You almost always burn and rarely tan in the sun. You are highly susceptible to skin damage as well as cancers like basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. You are also at high risk for melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer. Generally follow The Skin Cancer Foundation’s prevention tips but also consider using a sunscreen with a SPF of 30+ and clothing with a UPF rating of 30 or higher. Seek the shade whenever you are out in the sun. Check your skin head-to-toe each month, paying careful attention to any suspicious growths, and make sure you have an annual professional skin checkup.

    Type III:

    skintype_3

    You sometimes burn and sometimes tan in the sun. You are susceptible to skin damage as well as cancers like basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. You are also at risk for melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer. Be sure to apply a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 every day, wear sun-protective clothing, and seek the shade between 10 AM and 4 PM, when the sun is strongest. Check your skin head-to-toe each month, paying careful attention to any suspicious growths, and make sure you have an annual professional skin checkup.

    Type IV:

    skintype_4

    You tend to tan easily and are less likely to burn. But you are still at risk; use sunscreen with an SPF of 15+ outside and seek the shade between 10 AM and 4 PM. Follow all other Prevention Tips from The Skin Cancer Foundation as well. Check your skin head-to-toe each month, paying careful attention to any suspicious growths, and make sure you have an annual professional skin checkup.

    Type V:

    skintype_5

    You tan easily and rarely burn, but you are still at risk. Use sunscreen with an SPF of 15+ and seek the shade between 10 AM and 4 PM. Acral lentiginous melanoma, a very virulent form of the disease, is more common among darker-skinned people. These melanomas tend to appear on parts of the body not often exposed to the sun, and often remain undetected until after the cancer has spread. Check your skin head-to-toe each month, paying careful attention to any suspicious growths, and make sure you have an annual professional skin checkup. Keep an eye out for any suspicious growths, especially on the palms, soles of the feet and mucous membranes.

    Type VI:

    skintype_6

    Although you do not burn, dark-skinned people are still at risk for skin cancers, and should wear sunscreen with a SPF of 15+ and seek the shade between 10 AM and 4 PM. Acral lentiginous melanoma, a very virulent form of the disease, is more common among darker-skinned people. These melanomas tend to appear on parts of the body not often exposed to the sun, and often remain undetected until after the cancer has spread. Check your skin head-to-toe each month, paying careful attention to any suspicious growths, and make sure you have an annual professional skin checkup. Keep an eye out for any suspicious growths, especially on the palms, soles of the feet and mucous membranes.

    by Skin Cancer Foundation

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